Mother’s Day 2015

Well, Mother’s Day is coming up again soon! I try to make an effort to fit Mother’s Day crafts into all of our classes so that every mom or grand mom feels special.ūüôā

I wrote a post last year with all the craft ideas I had found from the internet and Pinterest, and wanted to do the same again this year! I will update the post after Mother’s Day with any changes I made or how the crafts went. So here we go!

For our toddler class (2-3 year olds)

This class is the hardest for me to figure out, because depending on how many kids we have on a Sunday (and depending on if we have some of our more¬†crazy¬†challenging¬†little ones) it can be hard to get a craft done. But I think we will try to accomplish this one. This Handprint Flower Pot craft was done with Kindergarteners by the original poster, so I obviously won’t be having the kids write things they love about their mom, but may have the teachers ask the kids and then write it, or simply write “I love you mom” on the flower pot. We have some large stamp pads and will probably do stamps instead of paint to cut down on some of the mess factor, and I will cut out flowers and pots ahead of time so all the kids have to do is glue and color.

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For our preschool class (4-5 year olds)

This class tends to have an easier time accomplishing a craft; there usually aren’t an overwhelming amount of kids and most preschoolers can focus on a craft better than most toddlers. I decided to go with a pretty classic Mother’s Day craft this year for these guys: Painted Flower Pots. These can be as elaborate or simple as the kids want to make them, and although they are somewhat messy they should be manageable.

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For our elementary school class (K-5th grade)

Ok so I haven’t tested this craft out yet, but I think it would be really cool! Last year’s Mother’s Day project in this class was Shrinky Dinks, so it required baking in an oven for a few minutes (we used a large toaster oven) and although it was a little hectic, worked fine. When I saw this Fingerprint Necklace/Keychain¬†I thought it would be a really cool, personal, and special gift for moms. My thinking is that as the kids arrive, they will cut out a heart (or other shape if they prefer) and stamp their fingerprint into it. We will bake all of the pendants during the class time, and then before leaving the kids can write on them with Sharpies. The kids will have the option of making a necklace or keychain and can add beads if they want.

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Feel free to share your thoughts, use these ideas, or share other ideas you have for great Mother’s Day crafts to make in a classroom setting!

How to Pray

We are starting a unit on prayer this week and are starting out with a discussion on how the Bible tells us to pray. We’ll look at Matthew 6:5-8 to first see how Jesus says not to pray, then look at the Lord’s Prayer and other scriptures to see what we should do instead.

I found a neat little game to get our class time started in a lesson on prayer. I wrote Scripture verses about prayer in white crayon on white index cards and will hide them around the room. However, several cards have pictures or random words on them. The kids can color over the index card with a marker to reveal what is written in white crayon. We’ll use these verses in our discussion, writing our findings up on the white board. Then we will transition into some discussion.

I enjoyed this brief article on some things to emphasize when discussing prayer with older kids, like I will be doing this Sunday. It has some really great thoughts in a concise way of stating them. I’ll definitely be talking about this with my 4th & 5th graders.

Prayer does not come easy for me, and I’m sure it doesn’t come easy for a lot of kids. We live in such a busy world, with so many distractions constantly bombarding us. It’s hard to find peace in such a crazy life. That’s when we need to remember that communication is how we build any relationship, especially our relationship with God. Just like I need to be intentional to stay in touch with friends and calendar time to get together and enjoy each other, we need to be intentional about making time for God. Yes, prayer is something we can do anytime, anywhere, and God wants us to “pray without ceasing (1 Thessalonians 5:17)” but we also need to put forth an effort. God wants to be close to us. God wants to answer our prayers. We have to give him that opportunity.
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Getting to know you

Now that a new school year is starting, we had our “move-up Sunday” for all the student ministries. We had several Kindergarteners move up into the elementary class, and we have a huge group of 4th graders this year going into our Hightide class. I’m excited for this year!

Because our Hightide preteen class became such a tight-knit group last year, I want to encourage that to happen again this year, so we just played a bunch of icebreakers and get-to-know you games last Sunday for our first week. But they came off pretty well, so I thought I’d share some of the games that worked with this age group!

The first game we played is kind of like the game Headbandz–each person had a character name taped¬†to their back. They went around to different people asking yes or no questions to figure out who they were. As an added part of the game, once they figured out who they were their had to find their partner: for example, if someone was Mickey Mouse, they had to find Minnie; if someone was Cinderella, they had to find Prince Charming. Once they found their partner they had to learn three facts about that person. To encourage them to talk to each other, they could only ask each person two questions before finding someone else to talk to.
Note: Yes or no questions were a little difficult for the kids to figure out, so I eventually told them to just ask questions, and allowed kids to give hints if needed.

Next we played a variation of¬†Charades. I had only 4 cards for them to choose from which read “favorite animal,” “favorite sport,” “favorite thing to do,” “instrument you can play or would like to play.” When each kid came up, they had to act out what the answer was for them, allowing us all to learn something about them!
Note: The kids really liked this game! They asked to keep playing it after everyone had a turn.

Then we played the¬†M&M Icebreaker game. I’ve played this before, and it’s always creates a more interesting way to share facts about yourself. Each kid took 3 M&M’s, whatever color they wanted. Then I wrote questions on the board, and we went around the circle three times, with everyone answering one question each time. They had to answer the question that correlated with the color M&M they chose. For example: Red–something about yesterday, Orange–something you do well, Yellow–favorite subject in school, Green–what you want to be when you grow up, Blue–favorite movie this summer, Brown–something you can’t live without. This game was another hit!

We then played Get-to-know-you-BINGO! The kids really loved this one too! I made a BINGO board (see below) with various facts. They had to find someone who fit each fact, and had them initial it. Again to encourage more conversation, the kids could only get 2 squares initialed from each friend.

Finally, we played one of our Hightide favorites. We call it “the chair game” but it goes by many other names. Basically, everyone sits in a chair in a circle, with one person in the middle (without a chair). The person in the middle says something like “I like people who like baseball” or “I like people who are wearing jeans” or “I like people who like tobyMac” and whoever the statement applies to has to get up and find a new chair, while the person in the middle tries to get one of the newly-vacated chairs. Whoever is left in the middle takes a turn.

So there’s a few games that the 9 & 10 year-olds at our church enjoyed playing while getting to know each other!

 

Bingo Icebreaker

Hall of Faith

When we had our lesson on Hebrews last week, I said Hebrews 11 is sometimes called the “Hall of Faith”. One of our students said that “Hall of Faith” reminded him of the pop song “Hall of Fame.” So I told him he should rewrite the lyrics to be about what we were talking about.

And he did. And it’s awesome.

So here is “The Hall of Faith” by an 11-year-old boy named Chase. (To the tune of “Hall of Fame” by The Script)

You could be righteous
You could be the one
Lighting up the dark
Shining bright like the sun

You can have a pure heart
Preach it to the world
Let them see your light
Let them hear your words

You can stand strong
and put away your fears
If God is on your side, tell me
Who’ve you got to fear?

You’ll go on a mission
To spread God’s word
If you do all that
Then you’re gonna be

Standin’ in the Hall of Faith (yeah, yeah)
The Lord’s gonna know your name (yeah, yeah)
‘Cause you burn with the brightest flame (yeah, yeah)
And since the Lord’s gonna know your name
You’ll be on the Walls of the Hall of Faith

And you could lose the race
But don’t believe all the lies
Keep your head up high
Keep your eyes on the prize

Press on to the end
Never give up
Put your hope in God
And don’t believe in luck

Stand for the good
Stand for the truth
Stand for the peace
The right, the virtue

Go and seize the moment
This is your time
Livin’ for the moment
When you are

Standin’ in the Hall of Faith (yeah, yeah)
The Lord’s gonna know your name (yeah, yeah)
‘Cause you burn with the brightest flame (yeah, yeah)
And since the Lord’s gonna know your name
You’ll be on the Walls of the Hall of Faith

Be a champion, be a champion
Be a champion, be a champion,
From the walls of the Hall of Faith

Be students. Be teachers. Be doctors. Be preachers.
Be believers. Be leaders. Be courageous. Be champions. Be truth-seekers.

Standin’ in the Hall of Faith (yeah, yeah)
The Lord’s gonna know your name (yeah, yeah)
‘Cause you burn with the brightest flame (yeah, yeah)
And the Lord’s gonna know your name
You’ll be on the Walls of the Hall of Faith

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Hebrews

This Sunday, in our Hightide class with our 4th & 5th graders, we talked about the book of Hebrews. More specifically, we focused on the “Hall of Faith” section. Since we are wrapping up our brief walk through the Bible in this class, I thought these verses would be a good review on many of the stories we talked about a few months ago.

We read through several verses in Hebrews 11, picking out a few stories here and there to help them see what this chapter is about, then I wrote all the people from the chapter on the board, and had each student choose one. They then had to write who they were and what they did by faith, and draw a picture.

Here’s our Hall of Faith:

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Prayer

This week was the 1st Sunday of the month, which for us means switching it up. We take a break from our normal curriculum and format. The kids worship upstairs with their families and take communion with them. The kids sang a song from our upcoming VBS on stage, which the congregation always loves.

So we decided to talk to the kids about prayer.

Chris asked three questions and wrote their answers on the board. One interesting thing that we’ve found is that as long as you ask a lot of questions and keep it very interactive, kids don’t mind sitting still for a lesson for about 20 minutes. You don’t always have to have games and object lessons and videos, though those are all very good and have their place.

Anyway. Chris first asked the kids:¬†Who do you like to talk to? We got lots of answers like friends, family, and a few funny ones like, “Siri” and “myself.” Then we asked the kids¬†What do you like to talk about?¬†We received answers like food, video games, movies, Minecraft, pizza, sports, that sort of thing.

Then we asked the kids¬†What do you talk to God about?¬†And we got a lot more serious answers, like asking for healing, safe travel, praying for food, help on tests, etc. So Chris asked the kids if they talk to their friends about the things they talk to God about, and most said no, because friends can’t heal someone or help you on a test. Then he asked do you talk to God about the things you talk to friends about?¬†We got a resounding No! So we asked why? They didn’t really have an answer. I was expecting them to say that “God doesn’t care” but they just didn’t seem to know why. So we told them that you can talk to God about anything and everything, because he loves us and cares about us and cares about what we care about.

Finally, we asked the kids¬†How do you pray?¬†One kid said, “You have to fold your hands, close your eyes, say ‘Dear God’ at the beginning and ‘Amen’ at the end.” So we said that’s a good way to start, and read Matthew 6:5-13, talking about how God doesn’t want us to be showy, he just wants us to be honest with him. We talked about five things to do when you pray: Praise God for who he is, Read the Bible prayerfully, Ask for things we need, Confess things we have done wrong and ask for forgiveness, and Thank God for what he has given us.

At the end of class, we divided the kids into groups of 5-6 kids with a leader, and had the kids say something they were thankful for and something they want to pray to God about. Then we had each kid pray that out loud in their group. It was a good time having an intimate setting and getting kids to start praying out loud and just praying honestly.

Paul’s Letters

Although I would’ve liked to spend more time on Paul’s letters, I condensed an overview of them into one lesson. Our 5th graders will be moving out of our class at the end of next month, and I wanted to get through the whole Bible before they leave.

I got several ideas from a couple places on the web and combined them, but wasn’t able to copy the link properly; sorry for no citing of sources this time!

To start out, I wrote the names of all the rest of the books of the Bible after Acts¬†on the board, and asked the kids to guess which ones Paul wrote. We determined that he wrote 13, which is more books of the Bible than anyone else wrote, though they are short and don’t take up a lot of actual space in the Bible.

So, knowing that Paul wrote 13 books, I asked the kids to write 13 things you know about God. I gave out markers and colorful paper, and the kids got to work. After a few minutes, I asked if it was easy or harder than they thought it would be; most said hard and had only gotten about 4 or 5. If we have a hard time just writing 13 things about God, how did Paul write 13 long letters about God? We looked up 2 Timothy 3:16 and learned that Paul was able to write all that because God helped him. I then added that Paul wanted these letters to be shared and it pleases God when others read about him, so several of the kids posted their lists on our bulletin board once they had finished.

Now that we know God inspired Paul’s writings, we had to find out what God wanted Paul to write about. We read Ephesians 3:3-5 and found that God had a “mysterious” or “secret” plan he wanted Paul to share with the world.¬†I each of the kids a piece of white paper and a white crayon, and told them to write something good about themselves that not many people know that they would like to share.¬†So we read Ephesians 3:6-7 to find out that God’s plan is that everyone–no matter your background–is part of the body of Christ, that all people can be part of God’s family if they believe in Jesus.¬†We don’t want to keep good secrets to ourselves, especially if it’s something we are excited about!¬†The kids passed their paper to someone else, and we painted over the white crayons with watercolor paints, revealing the secrets.¬†

A lot of what Paul wrote was about Jews and Gentiles, because that was something the new church struggled with. Most of the Bible was about the Jewish nation, but Paul wanted everyone to know that through Jesus the gospel is for them.

Paul also wrote to encourage the churches in the many cities he had traveled to. He reminded them of God’s love and gave them instructions on how to live better.¬†I wrote down the names of all the kids in class, and had each kid draw another name.¬†The kids wrote a note of encouragement to the person they drew. I told them I would send the notes out on the first week of school, which about a month from now. The kids will probably forget about writing them, and will get a nice surprise in the mail. Most of the kids, especially the boys, just wrote a simple “have a good week,” but I think it was still good to get them thinking about encouraging others, especially people they might not be close friends with.

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